Chandigarh: Bulk generators may have to deal with waste in-house : The Tribune India


Tribune press service

Sandeep Rana

Chandigarh, June 16

Establishments that produce 50 kg of waste per day may be required to carry out in-house treatment.

In an effort to reduce the city’s total amount of wet waste from bulk generators, the municipality wrote to the UT administration to make changes to solid waste management regulations. Currently, establishments that generate 100 kg of waste per day are required to process it in-house.

Those who produce 50 kg of waste in the lead

  • Currently, institutions that produce 100 kg of waste per day are required to carry out internal treatment
  • Establishments that produce 50 kg of waste per day may be required to make a mandatory commitment
  • internal processing

Only 25 establishments treat the waste on their side. According to the MC, all commercial, institutional and multi-story buildings, as well as religious and government businesses are covered under the bulk waste generator category. Chandigarh produces a total of 550 tonnes of waste per day. Of this number, 350 tons consist solely of wet waste.

What the City Commissioner says

Our goal is to reduce the amount of wet waste, in addition to starting a facility for the proper treatment of wet waste. —Anindita Mitra, curator MC

“Our goal is to reduce the amount of wet waste, in addition to starting a proper treatment facility for wet waste,” Commissioner MC Anindita Mitra said.

The head of MC said that in six months they had increased the garbage handling capacity from 70 tonnes per day to 140 tonnes per day and the aim was to increase it to 200 tonnes over the next three months.

“Thanks to better management of the plant after receiving the sorted waste and reducing the composting cycle from 45 days to 20 days, we were able to increase the amount of waste processed,” she said.

The real estate agent approves the amendments to the articles of association

The UT Realtor with Deputy Commissioner has approved changes to building regulations to make backyard composting mandatory for 2 kanal homes.

“The estate agent approved it and now the chief architect will take a call about it. Following that, we will send it to the administrator for final approval,” the MC chief said.

To promote backyard composting, the civic body distributed two buckets each to 2,000 households in 10 selected neighborhoods. Kitchen scraps can be put in compost buckets, which have been sponsored by a private agency. After a few days, it will turn into manure and account for a third of the total waste. Manure can be used in plants at home. “We have taken a multi-pronged approach to composting. We are also setting up a composting facility at the Sector 39 grain market. We have already installed compost pits in all community centres. The manure generated from there will only be used in the community center gardens,” she said.

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